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Dependency And The Brain

Addictive Drugs And Alterations In The Brain

The brain is physically altered over time from using addictive substances. Drug use is prioritized over everything else because of the alterations that happen in the brain when an addiction forms.


The moment a person develops dependence, his or her brain is highly set to use substances in spite of the effects. Cravings for the substance can occur even after a lot of time has passed because any feelings or situations connected to the previous drug abuse can cause them, even though physical effects of a dependency are no longer present. Nevertheless, breaking the addiction is not beyond your reach. But individuals in recovery must know healing is an ongoing program. Treatment for addiction is improving every day and has swiftly advanced over the years. Seek the assistance of others if you or your loved one is fighting the problem.


Development Of Addictions

Every voluntary and involuntary choice we make is controlled by a complex organ in the body, the human brain. Everything from basic motor skills to heart and breathing rates to emotions and behaviour to decision makes is controlled by the brain. If an individual consumes an addictive drug, the limbic system discharges chemicals that make the exploiter feel great. Repeated drug abuse is encouraged by this. Thanks to specific modifications that the brain's rewards system has experienced, a person will, despite dangerous consequences, feel a severe, involuntary craving to use a drug. The top priority becomes feeding the addiction.


The brain has a part that is accountable for addiction. Limbic system is responsible for this. The system, as well referred to as the "brain reward system," is accountable for creating emotions of pleasure.



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Igniting The Brain Reward System

The brain's reward system is triggered when a person uses an addictive drug. Dependency might occur if a person often triggers this system with a substance. The brain reward system is usually sparked off when we engage in practices that are great for us. It is part and parcel of our natural capability to get used to and survive. When this system is activated, the brain assumes that whatever is occurring is necessary for survival. In that case, the brain rewards that activity by making one feel good.


For example, when we get thirsty, we drink water, which stimulates the reward system so we continue to repeat this action. Dependent substances hijack this system, leading to emotions of joy for activities that are really dangerous. Sadly, the effects on the brain reward system are far much potent from addictive substances.


Addiction And The Biochemistry

A necessary role in the reward system is dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the reward system and is a naturally produced chemical in the brain. When bought in the limbic system, substances either copy dopamine or lead to an excess creation of it in the brain.

The reason usual activities that spark off the brain reward system (drinking, food, music, sex, and many more) don't reprogram the brain for dependence is due to the production of normal rates of dopamine.

Regular levels of dopamine triggered by normal actions are 10 times lower than levels released with the use of addictive drugs.

Dopamine is usually combined with floods neuroreceptors by drugs. The intoxicating effect of alcohol and drugs is caused by the combination. The human brain can't create regular dopamine levels normally after prolonged and constant substance abuse. Typically, the drugs hijack the reward system.

This causes the brain to crave the substance in order to get dopamine back to normal levels. Users that find themselves in these situations have to use drugs in order to feel good.


Neurofeedback During Addiction

Neurofeedback is gradually becoming one of the best cure for drug reliance. Another name for this is Electroencephalogram (EEG) Biofeedback. To improve the performance of the brain, the brain is trained by using neurofeedback. Sensors are applied to the scalp by the person performing the therapy that monitor brain activity during this process. The leader then rewards the brain for diverting its own action to better, very healthy trends.

Neurofeedback aids in discovering any primary issues that may be setting off addiction, for example:

  • Depression
  • Nervousness
  • Being traumatized
  • Insomnia

Neurofeedback records a successful trend as addiction treatment option, as it helps retrain the brain how to function without drugs. Neurofeedback is often a part of a complete treatment plan by some treatment facilities. Find the perfect treatment centre for your needs by contacting us today on 0800 246 1509.