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Obtaining Help - Treatment

What's substance Dependency?

Drug dependence is a chronic disease sickness portrayed by neurotic or irrepressible drug craving plus use in spite of destructive results and alterations in the brain, which can be long term. Some people whose brain functions have been altered by drugs display some anti-social mannerisms. Substance dependency is also a relapsing illness. Relapse is returning to a habit of drug use after a serious attempt to stop using.


The way to drug dependence starts with the wilful act of using drugs. However, as time passes, an individual's ability to decide not to use drugs weakens. Looking for and taking the drugs gets to be distinctly compulsive. This unrelenting craving results from the effects of the drug on the brain over time. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

Dependency is an illness that affects behaviour and the brain.


Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

It isn't easy, but, yes, drug addiction is treatable. Since addiction is a chronic illness, curing it is not as easy as simply stopping the drugs for a few days. Most users require repeated or long-term care to quit using it altogether and get their lives back.


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Rehabilitation from drug use should result in the patient:

  • quit utilising drugs
  • remain drug-free
  • be a productive member at work, in society and in the family

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

According to scientific research conducted since the mid-1970s, the essential principles listed below should be the foundation of all successful treatment programmes:

  • Dependency is an intricate, but treatable illness which affects the functioning of the brain and behaviour.
  • There is no particular treatment that is fitting for all.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • The entire needs of the patient, not only drug use issues, should be delivered by a good treatment plan.
  • It's important to remain in treatment long enough.
  • The most common forms of treatment are behaviour therapies like counselling.
  • Together with psychological treatment, pharmaceutical drugs are also administered.
  • As the patient's needs change, the treatment plan must be adapted to fit the requirements.
  • Treatment ought to address other conceivable mental problems.
  • Medically assisted detoxification is just the very first step of the treatment.
  • The treatment does not rely on the volition of the patient to yield positive fruits.
  • Drug usage amid treatment must be observed constantly.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

What Steps Are Involved In Treating Addiction?

Different steps are involved in effective treatments:

  • detoxification (the procedure by which the body frees itself of a medication)
  • Therapy or counselling
  • Medicine (for opioid, tobacco, or liquor enslavement)
  • assessment and treatment for co-happening psychological well-being issues, for example, depression and anxiety
  • long haul follow-up to forestall backslide

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Family or community based recovery support systems are some of the things involved in a follow-up care.


How Is Drug Addiction Treated With Medication?

Medication can be employed to deal with withdrawal symptoms, treat co-occurring conditions and prevent a relapse.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Cleansing the body is not the same as treatment, it only the beginning of the journey. A patient who does not get any additional treatment after completing a detox generally continue their substance use. According to a study, 80% of detoxifications used medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Relapse Prevention Medications can help manage cravings and help patients re-establish normal brain activity. Medication is available for the treatment of tobacco (nicotine), alcohol and opioid (prescription pain relievers and heroin) dependency. Medications that could be used in treating cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) addiction are being developed by scientists at present. Individuals who utilize more than one drug, which is extremely normal, require treatment for the majority of the substances they utilise.

How Drug Addiction Is Treated Using Behavioural Therapies

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to:

  • Change their conducts and practices linked with drug usage
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • carry on with other kinds of treatment, like medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

Outpatient behavioural treatment involves different programs designed for patients with an organised calendar of regular meetings with a counsellor for behavioural health. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family treatment created for young people with drug abuse issues and their families which addresses a scope of impacts on their drug mishandle designs and is intended to enhance general family working
  • Motivational meeting, which capitalizes on individual's' status to change their conduct and enter treatment
  • Motivational incentives that work by positively reinforcing like rewards to help the patient's urge for drugs reduce

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. With the detox behind them, the patient is then able to start standard treatment regime coming in for therapy a few hours weekly to make sure they do not relapse.


Residential/inpatient treatment can also be extremely successful, particularly for patients with more serious issues (including co-occurring conditions). 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. An inpatient treatment facility can make use of different therapeutic approaches and they are usually aimed at assisting patients to lead a substance-free, crime-free life after completing the treatment.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme:

  • In the period it takes for the patient to recover, usually six to twelve months, the patient becomes a member of the community at the therapeutic facility. The whole group, including treatment staff and those in recuperation, approach as key specialists of progress, affecting the patient's states of mind, comprehension and practices related with drug utilisation.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, which ordinarily concentrates on detoxification and also giving early extensive counselling and readiness for treatment in a community based setting.
  • There are also recovery housing services aimed at giving a patient a place to stay in the short term as they recuperate from treatment in other establishments. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Coping With Joining The Community

Habitual intake of drugs alters the normal functions of the brain, and various things can cause one to have a burning desire to take the drugs. Patients at a residential rehab centre or a prison facility when undergoing treatment are taught how to tell what drives them to take drugs, how to avoid and also cope with those things once they re-join society.